USN-715-1: Linux kernel vulnerabilities

29 January 2009

linux vulnerabilities

A security issue affects these releases of Ubuntu and its derivatives:

  • Ubuntu 8.10

Software Description

  • linux

Details

Hugo Dias discovered that the ATM subsystem did not correctly manage socket counts. A local attacker could exploit this to cause a system hang, leading to a denial of service. (CVE-2008-5079)

It was discovered that the inotify subsystem contained watch removal race conditions. A local attacker could exploit this to crash the system, leading to a denial of service. (CVE-2008-5182)

Dann Frazier discovered that in certain situations sendmsg did not correctly release allocated memory. A local attacker could exploit this to force the system to run out of free memory, leading to a denial of service. (CVE-2008-5300)

Helge Deller discovered that PA-RISC stack unwinding was not handled correctly. A local attacker could exploit this to crash the system, leading do a denial of service. This did not affect official Ubuntu kernels, but was fixed in the source for anyone performing HPPA kernel builds. (CVE-2008-5395)

It was discovered that the ATA subsystem did not correctly set timeouts. A local attacker could exploit this to cause a system hang, leading to a denial of service. (CVE-2008-5700)

It was discovered that the ib700 watchdog timer did not correctly check buffer sizes. A local attacker could send a specially crafted ioctl to the device to cause a system crash, leading to a denial of service. (CVE-2008-5702)

Update instructions

The problem can be corrected by updating your system to the following package versions:

Ubuntu 8.10
linux-image-2.6.27-11-generic - 2.6.27-11.27
linux-image-2.6.27-11-server - 2.6.27-11.27
linux-image-2.6.27-11-virtual - 2.6.27-11.27

To update your system, please follow these instructions: https://wiki.ubuntu.com/Security/Upgrades.

After a standard system upgrade you need to reboot your computer to effect the necessary changes.

ATTENTION: Due to an unavoidable ABI change the kernel updates have been given a new version number, which requires you to recompile and reinstall all third party kernel modules you might have installed. If you use linux-restricted-modules, you have to update that package as well to get modules which work with the new kernel version. Unless you manually uninstalled the standard kernel metapackages (e.g. linux-generic, linux-server, linux-powerpc), a standard system upgrade will automatically perform this as well.

References